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What are Lathe Rings?

lathe rings on lincoln cent

Lathe Rings Definition: These concentric rings are produced by a lathe which shapes the cone-shaped face of the unfinished working die.  The cone is supposed to be polished smooth before hubbing. If polishing is omitted or inadequate, the surface will remain covered by concentric lathe marks which will not be erased by subsequent hubbing. Concentric rings can be seen … Read more

Gold and Silver Price Continues to Rise

gold price

Gold and silver futures retreated from 14-week highs but they still extended their string of weekly wins — three for gold and seven for silver. On Friday, gold for April delivery shed $2.50, or 0.2%, to settle at $1,239.10 an ounce on the Comex division of the New York Mercantile Exchange. “Gold is close to … Read more

Circulated or Uncirculated Coins

Circulated or Uncirculated? Proof or No Proof? Numismatic coins fall into one of two basic categories for quality: circulated and uncirculated. Circulated coins exhibit wear, whereas uncirculated coins do not. Uncirculated coins tend to be more valuable, causing investors and serious collectors to focus their efforts on acquiring the uncirculated alone. Numismatists are trained to … Read more

Doubled Dies – What are they and how much are they worth?

doubled dies

Doubled dies or the “doubled die” variety, is one of the most popular die varieties for collectors.  Because doubled dies are so popular, there is a lot of information out there about these varieties and they are often seen for sale on internet auction sites such as Ebay.  Unfortunately, not all of the information out … Read more

Possible Real 1964 D Peace Dollar

real peace dollar

Here’s a great video on a possible real 1964 D Peace Dollar

possible real 1964 D Peace Dollar
 

Peace Dollars (1921 – 1935)

Peace Dollars – In 1921, the Silver Peace Dollar was released, the same year the Morgan Dollar was discontinued. Peace Dollars are limited in supply and are very rare Silver coins. Created to celebrate America’s victory in World War I, these Silver coins helped establish the status of the U.S. as a major world power.

The obverse features the profile of Lady Liberty, while the reverse depicts the majestic image of a perched American eagle with an olive branch in its talons as a symbol of peace.

The Peace Dollar, minted from 1921-1928 and again in 1934 and 1935 was the last U.S. Silver dollar coin minted for circulation. American Silver dollars, mostly the Morgan dollar, were sold to the British and melted down to support them during World War I. Silver Peace Dollars were minted to replace the Morgan Silver Dollar. These rare Silver coins were designed to be emblematic of peace, but an early design that used a broken sword was dropped because people thought it signified defeat.

Early runs of the Peace dollar were plagued by problems with the die, adding numismatic value to the earlier U.S. dollar coins. Silver Peace dollars from 1934 also have extra collector value because not many were saved. Circulation quality American Silver dollars have not been produced since, adding a sense of history when you hold one of these Silver coins in your hands. Rare Silver coins are a way to view the American story, with lessons in how events such as war and depression affected the coinage of money.

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1945 Double Die Reverse Jefferson Nickel FS 801

1945 Double Die Reverse Jefferson Nickel FS 801

1945 Double Die Reverse Jefferson Nickel FS 801


Short video featuring the 1945 double die reverse Jefferson Nickel.
 

The Jefferson nickel has been the five-cent coin struck by the United States Mint since 1938, when it replaced the Buffalo nickel. From 1938 until 2004, the copper-nickel coin’s obverse featured a profile depiction of founding father and third U.S. President Thomas Jefferson by artist Felix Schlag; the obverse design used in 2005 was also in profile, though by Joe Fitzgerald. Since 2006 Jefferson’s portrayal, newly designed by Jamie Franki, faces forward. The coin’s reverse is still the Schlag original, although in 2004 and 2005 the piece bore commemorative designs.

First struck in 1913, the Buffalo nickel had long been difficult to coin, and after it completed the 25-year term during which it could only be replaced by Congress, the Mint moved quickly to replace it with a new design. The Mint conducted a design competition in early 1938, requiring that Jefferson be depicted on the obverse, and Jefferson’s house Monticello on the reverse. Schlag won the competition, but was required to submit an entirely new reverse and make other changes before the new piece went into production in October 1938.

As nickel was a strategic war material during World War II, nickels coined from 1942 to 1945 were struck in a copper-silver-manganese alloy which would not require adjustment to vending machines. They bear a large mint mark above the depiction of Monticello on the reverse. In 2004 and 2005, the nickel saw new designs as part of the Westward Journey nickel series, and since 2006 has borne Schlag’s reverse and Franki’s obverse.

 

Comment, email or private message me any questions or suggestions for videos on coins. Don’t forget to like and subscribe so we can build the community and stay in touch!

My Coin Website: http://www.coinopp.tk

VARIETY AND ERROR COINS facebook group
https://www.facebook.com/groups/14310…

Robert Lawson’s ebay
http://www.ebay.com/sch/errors-4-u/m….

What is a Doubled die coin and what are die classes?

doubled die obverse

What is a Doubled die coin and what are die classes?

 

Doubled die coin is a term in numismatics used to refer to doubling in the design elements of a coin. A Doubled die coin can appear as an outline of the design or in extreme cases, having legends and dates appear twice in an overlapping fashion.

Wrong Planchet Errors or Off Metal Errors

wrong planchet

Examples of Wrong Planchet Errors and Off Metal Errors on Coins.
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Off metals and wrong planchet errors occur when a blank from one denomination is accidentally fed into a press for another denomination. Examples are a nickel struck on a cent planchet and a cent struck on a dime planchet. The coin struck on an incorrect blank will weigh exactly what the denomination of that blank would have been. An even more dramatic wrong planchet error is a coin struck on a previously struck coin of a different metal.

 

 

Extra Information:

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Guide to US Coins

Guide to US Coins A U.S. type coin set offers collectors an opportunity to show their individuality. Ultimately, this set should be fun and rewarding to build. But what exactly is a type set? This set should contain one coin of every major design and metallic composition within a series. It is arranged by denomination … Read more

Wide AM and Close AM Lincoln Varieties

wide-am-vs-close-am-lincoln-memorial-cent error coins

Wide AM and Close AM Lincoln Varieties Lincoln cent varieties.

So, what exactly is a Wide AM and Close AM Cent?
The terms Close AM and Wide AM refer to the spacing between the letters ‘A’ and ‘M’ in “America” on the reverse of the Lincoln Memorial Cent. The terms generally refer to the different die varieties of 1992, 1998, 1999 and 2000. From its introduction in 1959 through 1992, all Lincoln Memorial Cents including both business and proof strikes were intended to have the Wide AM reverse. In 1993 the mint changed to the Close AM reverse for both its business and proof strikes. Then in 1994 the mint changed once more and began to produce all business strikes with Close AMs, while using the Wide AMs on all proofs, until the coins last year of production in 2008.

 

So, what are the varieties?
The first and rarest of the varieties is the 1992 and 1992D Close AM. It appears that the mint used the reverse die intended for the 1993 cent on an unknown but limited number of 1992 cents at both the Philadelphia and Denver mint.  As of the time of this writing, there are only three known examples from the Philadelphia mint and less than 15 from Denver. A 1992D Close AM PCGS AU58 recently fetched $3,550 here on eBay.

The next rarest is the 1998S and 1999S Proof Strike Close AM variety. The 1998 being the rarer of the two, generally selling in the $300 range, and the 1999S around $100.

The third and final variety is the 1998, 1999, and 2000 Wide AM, with the 1999 being the rarest, then 1998, and finally the 2000. Although the least valuable in this article, they may be the most exciting as it can generally be found in circulation. The 2013 Redbook values the 1999 at $500, 1998 at $25, and 2000 at $20. I have personally found the 1998 Wide AM in pocket change.

So, How do I tell them apart?
The simplest and most obvious way to tell the two apart is to first look at a known Wide AM (1959-1991), and compare it with a known Close AM (1993-1997; 2001-2008) with a jewelers loop or magnifying glass. A Close AM should appear to either be touching or have just enough space between the letters for a piece of paper to slide between them. The  letters of the Wide AM variety will look separated and like a piece of paper will have a lot of wiggle room if slid between. After examining under a magnifying glass enough times, your eye will become accustomed to the difference, and you should be able to tell which is which with the naked eye.

The other way to tell them apart is to look at the distance between the initials “FG” and the base of the Lincoln Memorial. The Close AM variety will have wide initials, whereas the Wide AM variety will have close initials. Just remember the opposite will be true for the initials and the AM. I personally find this method unnecessary and more difficult than the first.

Example of Wide AM (top) and Close AM (bottom)

Image Courtesy of NGC

Notable Mention:
In January 2009, Billy Crawford author of Die Variety News, a bi-monthly magazine dedicated to the various die varieties of Lincoln cents and other US coins, reported the discovery of a unique 1996 Wide AM variety Lincoln Cent. The coin was reported to have a 50 degree rotational die error reverse and be of the Wide AM variety. It was said to have been stolen from him along with other coins in a robbery outside of a coin show a short time later. Its existence was never authenticated by a third party grading service, and its current whereabouts is unknown.

Wide AM vs Close AM Lincoln Varieties