San Antonio Missions Quarters for Texas Released

Available products include 2-roll sets, 3-roll sets, 40-coin rolls, and 100-coin bags. They include circulating quality quarters pulled directly from the U.S. Mint’s production floors in Philadelphia, Denver and San Francisco.

San Antonio Missions were instrumental in the founding of the City of San Antonio. Established in the early 1700s, they were among the largest concentrations of Spanish missions in North America.

“After 10,000 years, the people of South Texas found their cultures, their very lives under attack. In the early 1700s Apache raided from the north, deadly diseases traveled from Mexico, and drought lingered. Survival lay in the missions,” the National Park Service describes. “By entering a mission, they forswore their traditional life to become Spanish, accepting a new religion and pledging fealty to a distant and unseen king.”

The frontier missions were designed to be self-sustaining, providing protection and a means to spread Christianity.

San Antonio Missions Quarter Designs

San Antonio Missions quarter reverses (tails side) depict elements of the Spanish Colonial Real coin to pay tribute to the missions. Inside designed quadrants are symbols of the missions: wheat symbolizes farming; the arches and bell symbolize community; a lion represents Spanish cultural heritage; and a symbol of the San Antonio River represents irrigation methods and life-sustaining resources. Inscriptions around the design include “SAN ANTONIO MISSIONS,” “TEXAS,” “2019,” and “E PLURIBUS UNUM.”

2019-P Uncirculated and Proof San Antonio Missions National Historical Park quarters

The San Antonio Missions National Historical Park quarter for Texas depict elements of the Spanish Colonial Real coin. The two CoinNews photos above show uncirculated (left) and proof (right) quarters released earlier in the year for collectors. The coins in the rolls and bags released today look most like the uncirculated quarter.

U.S. Mint AIP member Chris Costello created the reverse design and U.S. Mint Chief Engraver Joe Menna sculpted it. In the following Mint video, Menna and Costello talk briefly about their work on the coin.

John Flanagan’s portrait of George Washington is seen on coin obverses (heads side). This design, with some modest revisions, has appeared on every quarter issued by the United States since 1932.

Inscriptions include “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,” “LIBERTY,” “IN GOD WE TRUST,” and “QUARTER DOLLAR.” Obverses also have a mintmark denoting where they were made with a “P” for Philadelphia, a “D” for Denver and an “S” for San Francisco.

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