Indent Coins Price Guide

Indent Coins

An indent coin error happens when two blanks are fed accidentally into the same collar. One blank overlays over the other causing the error to exist. When the die hammer strikes the combination

indent coins

of the two coins in the same collar, it creates a depression similar to the blank on the top. A very rare case would be if two different denominations of blanks are fed into a collar and create an  indention of both types of blanks.

Mints use hubs bearing raised images similar to the images that appear on a coin to imprint indented images onto steel rods. Those rods become the dies which strike planchets making them into coins.

Hub and die errors can occur at the time dies are made, when the dies are installed into presses, and from die deterioration during use. Modern coins are still released with hub and die errors, mainly because the defects are usually too small to be seen with the naked eye. A few exceptions exist, where the dies are used despite producing obvious flaws. The 1955 Lincoln cent is an example.

Indent Coins Price Guide:

Additional Price Guide Entries:

Multi Struck Coins

Uni Face Coins

Fragments

Proofs

Partial Collar Coins

Wrong Planchet / Off Metal Errors

Off Center Coins

Mated Coins

Martha Washington Test Pieces

Indents

U.S. Gold Errors

Fold Overs

Double Denominational Coins

Die Caps

Adjustment Strikes

Brockages

Counterbrockages

Broadstrikes

Bonded Coins

Translate »